Department News Archive


Emily Anderson wins Johns Hopkins Catalyst Award

Emily Anderson wins Johns Hopkins Catalyst Award
Emily Anderson has been chosen as one of 36 early career faculty members to receive Johns Hopkins Catalyst Award, an honor that is accompanied by a $75,000 grant, mentoring opportunities, […]


Sanchita Balachandran wins Iris Award

Congratulations to Sanchita Balachandran, who has been awarded the annual Iris Award for Outstanding Mid-Career Scholar by the Bard Graduate Center. The Iris awards honor outstanding individuals who have contributed to […]


Skylar Hurst and William Lewis Win Evangelia Davos Prize

Congratulations to Skylar Hurst and William Lewis, recipients of the 2020 Evangelia Davos Prize in Classics. Skylar is a senior in the Classics BA/MA program and will complete her MA work in her fourth […]


Emma Roalsvig Wins Evangelia Davos Prize

Congratulations to Emma Roalsvig, recipient of the 2019 Evangelia Davos Prize. Each year the Department of Classics awards the prize to the undergraduate major or minor in classics whose work in Greek studies has been outstanding. This cash prize was established in 2007 by a gift from Peter Davos ’00 and is named in honor of his aunt.


Open Lab Night for the John Addington Symonds Project

Open Lab Night for the John Addington Symonds Project
Student researchers in the John Addington Symonds Project (JASP) opened the Classics Research Lab (CRL) to scores of visitors on May 1. They demonstrated the project’s new website, symondsproject.org, and […]


Symonds Project Website Launches

Symonds Project Website Launches
The John Addington Symonds Project (JASP), which is part of the Classics Research Lab (CRL), has launched its new website, symondsproject.org. There you can learn about the project and its […]


Marcel Detienne, Gildersleeve Professor Emeritus of Classics, Passes Away

Professor Detienne was one of the most prominent classicists of his generation. A Belgian-born historian and renowned specialist in the study of ancient Greece, he taught in the Department of Classics from 1992 until his retirement in 2007. His career was dedicated to an innovative— even audacious—crossing of disciplinary boundaries, notably setting anthropology and history in dialogue as a means of bringing new questions and insights to the study of ancient Greece.