Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another pogram, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

The Roman Empire
AS.040.103 (01)

This introductory course examines the history, society, and culture of the Roman state in the Imperial age (ca. 31 BCE-ca. 500 CE), during which it underwent a traumatic transition from an oligarchic to a monarchic form of government, attained its greatest territorial expanse, produced its most famous art, architecture, and literature, experienced vast cultural and religious changes, and finally was transformed into an entirely different ("late antique") form of society. All readings in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elementary Ancient Greek
AS.040.105 (01)

This course provides a comprehensive, intensive introduction to the study of ancient Greek. During the first semester, the focus will be on morphology and vocabulary. Credit is given only upon completion of a year's work. Cannot be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Representing Roman Power: Sculpture as Political Rhetoric from Republic to Empire
AS.010.222 (01)

Rome created one of the world’s most powerful empires that dominated the Mediterranean from the 3rd century BCE into the 4th century CE. As Rome expanded its borders, its cities saw a proliferation of sculptural monuments that produced a visual political rhetoric and expressed imperial ideologies. This class examines the close relationship between Roman sculpture and politics from the Republic through the Severan principate. Through close visual analysis of the ancient materials and critical readings of scholarship, this course will examine the role of sculpture in the formation, reproduction, and attenuation of imperial rule.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/12
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC

Elementary Latin
AS.040.107 (01)

This course provides a comprehensive, intensive introduction to the study of Latin for new students, as well as a systematic review for those students with a background in Latin. Emphasis during the first semester will be on morphology and vocabulary. Credit is given only upon completion of a year’s work. Course may not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.50
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/17
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elementary Latin
AS.040.107 (02)

This course provides a comprehensive, intensive introduction to the study of Latin for new students, as well as a systematic review for those students with a background in Latin. Emphasis during the first semester will be on morphology and vocabulary. Credit is given only upon completion of a year’s work. Course may not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.50
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 10/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Ancient Greek Mythology: Art, Narratives, and Modern Mythmaking
AS.040.121 (01)

This course focuses on major and often intricate myths and mythical patterns of thought as they are reflected in compelling ancient visual and textual narratives. Being one of the greatest treasure troves of the ancient world, these myths will further be considered in light of their rich reception in the medieval and modern world (including their reception in the modern fields of anthropology and philosophy).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Story and Argument from Homer to Petrarch
AS.040.145 (01)

Stories entertain us, but we also tell them to make a point. This course will explore the ways that stories were used to make points by Greek and Latin authors from Homer to Petrarch, while also looking at, and comparing them to, the techniques of argument contemporaneous thinkers were developing. This is a course about narrative and rhetoric but also about how and in what way stories matter.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate Ancient Greek
AS.040.205 (01)

Reading ability in classical Greek is developed through a study of various authors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate Latin
AS.040.207 (01)

Although emphasis is still placed on development of rapid comprehension, readings and discussions introduce student to study of Latin literature, principally through texts of various authors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Celebration and Performance in Early Greece
AS.040.218 (01)

Surviving imagery suggests that persons in Minoan and Mycenaean societies engaged in various celebratory performances, including processions, feasts, and ecstatic dance. This course explores archaeological evidence of such celebrations, focusing on sociocultural roles, bodily experience, and interpretive challenges.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

The Greeks and Their Emotions
AS.040.241 (01)

This seminar is meant as an introduction to the study of ancient emotions, with a particular emphasis on how the Greeks of the Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic periods conceptualized, portrayed and lived their emotions through linguistic, literary and artistic expression. After an analysis of how the ancient Greek terminology for the emotions differs from our own, we shall focus on the phenomenon of emotion as deeply rooted in the physical body, and in light of this we will contemplate (and question) its universality. Texts will be read in translation. No knowledge of ancient Greek required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Ancient Greek
AS.040.305 (01)

Reading of prose or verse authors, depending on the needs of students. Co-listed with AS.040.705.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Greek Philosophy
AS.150.201 (01)

A survey of the earlier phase of Greek philosophy. Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle will be discussed, as well as two groups of thinkers who preceded them, usually known as the pre-Socratics and the Sophists.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/25
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ANCIEN

Death and Dying in Art, Literature, and Philosophy: Introduction to Medical Humanities
AS.145.101 (03)

This team-taught course offers an interdisciplinary introduction to the university's new concentration in "Medicine, Science, and Humanities." The themes of death, dying, and the treatment of the dead are explored in their changing historical, anthropological, philosophical, literary, art historical and medical dimensions. Open to freshmen, sophomores, and upperclass Medicine, Science, and Humanities majors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Survey of Greek Literature I: Homer to the Classical Period
AS.040.417 (01)

We shall read an extensive selection of major texts of Greek literature from Homer to the classical period.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Death and Dying in Art, Literature, and Philosophy: Introduction to Medical Humanities
AS.145.101 (02)

This team-taught course offers an interdisciplinary introduction to the university's new concentration in "Medicine, Science, and Humanities." The themes of death, dying, and the treatment of the dead are explored in their changing historical, anthropological, philosophical, literary, art historical and medical dimensions. Open to freshmen, sophomores, and upperclass Medicine, Science, and Humanities majors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Death and Dying in Art, Literature, and Philosophy: Introduction to Medical Humanities
AS.145.101 (01)

This team-taught course offers an interdisciplinary introduction to the university's new concentration in "Medicine, Science, and Humanities." The themes of death, dying, and the treatment of the dead are explored in their changing historical, anthropological, philosophical, literary, art historical and medical dimensions. Open to freshmen, sophomores, and upperclass Medicine, Science, and Humanities majors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Latin Prose
AS.040.307 (01)

This course aims to increase proficiency and improve comprehension of the Latin language. Intensive reading of Latin texts, with attention to grammar, idiom, translation, etc. Specific offerings vary. Co-listed with AS.040.707.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction To Archaeology
AS.136.101 (01)

An introduction to archaeology and to archaeological method and theory, exploring how archaeologists excavate, analyze, and interpret ancient remains in order to reconstruct how ancient societies functioned. Specific examples from a variety of archaeological projects in different parts of the world will be used to illustrate techniques and principles discussed.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 38/70
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Introduction to Greek Philosophy
AS.150.201 (02)

A survey of the earlier phase of Greek philosophy. Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle will be discussed, as well as two groups of thinkers who preceded them, usually known as the pre-Socratics and the Sophists.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ANCIEN

Freshman Seminar:Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (04)

Freshman Seminar: Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2018 include Homer, Boethius, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Descartes, Aphra Behn, Mary Shelley, Mozart, Douglass, and Woolf.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (02)

Freshman Seminar: Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2018 include Homer, Boethius, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Descartes, Aphra Behn, Mary Shelley, Mozart, Douglass, and Woolf.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Greek Philosophy
AS.150.201 (03)

A survey of the earlier phase of Greek philosophy. Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle will be discussed, as well as two groups of thinkers who preceded them, usually known as the pre-Socratics and the Sophists.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/25
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ANCIEN

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (03)

Freshman Seminar: Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2018 include Homer, Boethius, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Descartes, Aphra Behn, Mary Shelley, Mozart, Douglass, and Woolf.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (01)

Freshman Seminar: Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2018 include Homer, Boethius, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Descartes, Aphra Behn, Mary Shelley, Mozart, Douglass, and Woolf.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Greek Philosophy
AS.150.201 (04)

A survey of the earlier phase of Greek philosophy. Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle will be discussed, as well as two groups of thinkers who preceded them, usually known as the pre-Socratics and the Sophists.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ANCIEN

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (05)

Freshman Seminar: Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2018 include Homer, Boethius, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Descartes, Aphra Behn, Mary Shelley, Mozart, Douglass, and Woolf.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.040.103 (01)The Roman EmpireTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMRoller, MatthewGilman 17
AS.040.105 (01)Elementary Ancient GreekMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AMFranklin, Ryan, StaffGilman 108
AS.010.222 (01)Representing Roman Power: Sculpture as Political Rhetoric from Republic to EmpireMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMMiranda, Amy ChristineKrieger LavertyHART-ANC
AS.040.107 (01)Elementary LatinMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMWarwick, RyanGilman 108
AS.040.107 (02)Elementary LatinMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMStaffShaffer 300
AS.040.121 (01)Ancient Greek Mythology: Art, Narratives, and Modern MythmakingTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMYatromanolakis, DimitriosMaryland 202
AS.040.145 (01)Story and Argument from Homer to PetrarchTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMCannon, ChristopherGilman 108
AS.040.205 (01)Intermediate Ancient GreekTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMYatromanolakis, DimitriosGilman 108
AS.040.207 (01)Intermediate LatinMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMTabeling, AdamGilman 108
AS.040.218 (01)Celebration and Performance in Early GreeceM 1:30PM - 4:00PMAnderson, Emily S.K.Gilman 108ARCH-ARCH
AS.040.241 (01)The Greeks and Their EmotionsMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMAsuni, MicheleGilman 134
AS.040.305 (01)Advanced Ancient GreekTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMYatromanolakis, DimitriosGilman 108
AS.150.201 (01)Introduction to Greek PhilosophyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMBett, RichardOlin 305PHIL-ANCIEN
AS.145.101 (03)Death and Dying in Art, Literature, and Philosophy: Introduction to Medical HumanitiesT 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AMEnder, Evelyne, Merback, Mitchell, Stephens, Walter EGilman 50
AS.040.417 (01)Survey of Greek Literature I: Homer to the Classical PeriodW 4:30PM - 7:00PMMontiglio, SilviaGilman 108
AS.145.101 (02)Death and Dying in Art, Literature, and Philosophy: Introduction to Medical HumanitiesT 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AMEnder, Evelyne, Merback, Mitchell, Stephens, Walter EGilman 50
AS.145.101 (01)Death and Dying in Art, Literature, and Philosophy: Introduction to Medical HumanitiesT 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AMEnder, Evelyne, Merback, Mitchell, Stephens, Walter EGilman 50
AS.040.307 (01)Advanced Latin ProseMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMButler, Michael ShaneGilman 108
AS.136.101 (01)Introduction To ArchaeologyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMSchwartz, Glenn MGilman 50ARCH-ARCH
AS.150.201 (02)Introduction to Greek PhilosophyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, W 2:00PM - 2:50PMBett, RichardOlin 305PHIL-ANCIEN
AS.360.133 (04)Freshman Seminar:Great Books at HopkinsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMRefini, EugenioLevering Arellano
AS.360.133 (02)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMEgginton, WilliamLevering Arellano
AS.150.201 (03)Introduction to Greek PhilosophyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMBett, RichardOlin 305PHIL-ANCIEN
AS.360.133 (03)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMWeiss, Susan ForscherLevering Arellano
AS.360.133 (01)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMDaniel, AndrewLevering Arellano
AS.150.201 (04)Introduction to Greek PhilosophyMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, W 2:00PM - 2:50PMBett, RichardOlin 305PHIL-ANCIEN
AS.360.133 (05)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMWeiss, Susan ForscherLevering Arellano

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another pogram, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

The Idea of Athens
AS.010.309 (01)

This course will explore the art, architecture, material culture, and textual evidence from the ancient city of Athens, the many cultures and social positions that made up the ancient city, and the idea of the city as something far beyond its reality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH

Intermediate Ancient Greek
AS.040.206 (01)

Reading ability in classical Greek is developed through a study of various authors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Latin Poetry
AS.040.308 (01)

The aim of this course is to increase proficiency and improve comprehension of the Latin language. Intensive reading of Latin texts, with close attention to matters of grammar, idiom, and translation. Co-listed with AS.040.710.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elementary Ancient Greek
AS.040.106 (01)

Course provides comprehensive, intensive introduction to the study of ancient Greek. The first semester’s focus is morphology and vocabulary; the second semester’s emphasis is syntax and reading. Credit is given only upon completion of a year’s work. Course may not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elementary Latin
AS.040.108 (01)

Course provides comprehensive, intensive introduction to the study of Latin for new students as well as systematic review for students with background in Latin. The first semester's emphasis is on morphology and vocabulary; the second semester's focus is on syntax and reading. Credit is given only upon completion of a year's work. Course may not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.50
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Island Archaeology: The Social Worlds of Crete, Cyprus and the Cyclades
AS.040.232 (01)

Islands present highly distinctive contexts for social life. We examine three island worlds of the third and second millennia BCE through their archaeological remains, each with its particularities. These are places where water had a unique and powerful meaning, where boat travel was part of daily life, where palaces flourished and where contact with other societies implied voyages of great distance across the sea. Class combines close study of material culture and consideration of island-specific interpretive paradigms; students work with artifacts in the JHU Archaeological Museum.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Advanced Ancient Greek
AS.040.306 (01)

Reading of prose or verse authors, depending on the needs of students. Co-listed with AS.040.702.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate Latin
AS.040.208 (01)

Reading ability in Latin is developed through the study of various authors, primarily Cicero (fall) and Vergil (spring).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Survey of Greek Literature II: Hellenistic Period to Imperial Period
AS.040.418 (01)

We shall read, in the original Greek, major authors of Greek Literature from the Hellenistic period to the Imperial period.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Greek Philosophy: Plato and His Predecessors
AS.150.401 (01)

A study of pre-Socratic philosophers, especially those to whom Plato reacted; also an examination of major dialogues of Plato with emphasis upon his principal theses and characteristic methods.Cross-listed with Classics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ANCIEN

The Art and Archaeology of Early Greece
AS.040.102 (01)

This course explores the origins and rise of Greek civilization from the Early Bronze Age to the Persian Wars (ca. 3100-480 B.C.), focusing on major archaeological sites, sanctuaries, material culture, and artistic production.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Classics Research Lab: The Symonds Project
AS.040.420 (01)

This course gives participants a unique opportunity to engage directly in empirical research and its interpretation and dissemination. Topics vary. This semester’s offering is organized around a project to reconstruct digitally the library of the nineteenth-century writer John Addington Symonds, author of one of the first studies of ancient sexuality. No prerequisites, but potential students should contact instructor for permission to enroll.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL

Witchcraft and Demonology in Literature and the Arts
AS.211.477 (01)

Who were the witches? Why were they persecuted for hundreds of years? Why were women identified as the witches par excellence? How many witches were put to death between 1400 and 1800? What traits did European witch-mythologies share with other societies? After the witch-hunts ended, how did “The Witch” go from being “monstrous” to being “admirable” and even “sexy”? Answers are found in history and anthropology, but also in theology,literature, folklore, music, and the visual arts, including cinema.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/70
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL

Poetry and Social Engagement
AS.220.454 (01)

In this Community-Based Learning course, students will explore poetry of social and political concern in partnership with high-school age writers from Baltimore public schools. Students will put learning into practice by engaging in community conversation and collaboration. Participation in some events outside of class time will be required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Gendered Voices
AS.211.374 (02)

The course will explore the notion of ‘voice’ in order to show how poetry, literature, philosophy, and music have been dealing with it throughout the ages. In particular, by focusing on classical figures such as the Sirens, Circe and Echo, as well as by considering the seminal discussions of the 'voice' in Plato and Aristotle, the course will address the gendered nature of the voice as a tool to seduce and manipulate the human mind. More specifically, the course will discuss the ways in which male, female, queer, gendered and un-gendered voices embody different functions. Course materials include classical, medieval and early modern sources as well as later rewritings of myths concerned with the voice by authors such as Jules Verne, Karen Blixen, Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa, and Italo Calvino. A selection of theoretical works (e.g. Cavarero, Silverman, Dollar, Butler) will also be discussed. The course is taught in English and all materials will be available in English translation; Italian majors and minors should enroll in section 2.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/5
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL

Gendered Voices
AS.211.374 (01)

The course will explore the notion of ‘voice’ in order to show how poetry, literature, philosophy, and music have been dealing with it throughout the ages. In particular, by focusing on classical figures such as the Sirens, Circe and Echo, as well as by considering the seminal discussions of the 'voice' in Plato and Aristotle, the course will address the gendered nature of the voice as a tool to seduce and manipulate the human mind. More specifically, the course will discuss the ways in which male, female, queer, gendered and un-gendered voices embody different functions. Course materials include classical, medieval and early modern sources as well as later rewritings of myths concerned with the voice by authors such as Jules Verne, Karen Blixen, Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa, and Italo Calvino. A selection of theoretical works (e.g. Cavarero, Silverman, Dollar, Butler) will also be discussed. The course is taught in English and all materials will be available in English translation; Italian majors and minors should enroll in section 2.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/14
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL

Why Poetry Matters: Poets Between Lies and Truth in the English and Italian Renaissance
AS.211.351 (01)

Does poetry participate in the quest for truth and knowledge? How does it compare to other such disciplines as history or philosophy? Are poets liars or do they have a deeper gaze on reality than anyone else? To answer these questions, this course studies poetry’s role within the different fields of human learning in the Renaissance. We will focus on the English and Italian tradition, reading texts by John Milton and Torquato Tasso, and explore the classical roots of the debate around poetry (Aristotle, Plato, Horace). We will then examine the relationship between science and literature through the work of Galileo Galilei. We will also study rare and ancient books in our library. The course is taught in English. All readings will be in English, but the original texts will also be available.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/12
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.309 (01)The Idea of AthensMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMStager, Jennifer M SGilman 177HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH
AS.040.206 (01)Intermediate Ancient GreekTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMAsuni, MicheleGilman 108
AS.040.308 (01)Advanced Latin PoetryMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMMontiglio, SilviaGilman 108
AS.040.106 (01)Elementary Ancient GreekMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AMFranklin, RyanGilman 108
AS.040.108 (01)Elementary LatinMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMWarwick, RyanGilman 108
AS.040.232 (01)Island Archaeology: The Social Worlds of Crete, Cyprus and the CycladesT 1:30PM - 4:00PMAnderson, Emily S.K.Gilman 130GARCH-ARCH
AS.040.306 (01)Advanced Ancient GreekTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMAsuni, MicheleGilman 108
AS.040.208 (01)Intermediate LatinMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMToomey, Melissa EGilman 108
AS.040.418 (01)Survey of Greek Literature II: Hellenistic Period to Imperial PeriodM 4:30PM - 7:00PMMontiglio, SilviaGilman 108
AS.150.401 (01)Greek Philosophy: Plato and His PredecessorsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBett, RichardGilman 75PHIL-ANCIEN
AS.040.102 (01)The Art and Archaeology of Early GreeceTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMAnderson, Emily S.K.Gilman 55ARCH-ARCH
AS.040.420 (01)Classics Research Lab: The Symonds ProjectTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMButler, Michael ShaneGilman 108GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL
AS.211.477 (01)Witchcraft and Demonology in Literature and the ArtsMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMStephens, Walter ELevering ArellanoGRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL
AS.220.454 (01)Poetry and Social EngagementM 4:00PM - 6:20PMMalech, Dora RachelCroft Hall B32WRIT-POET
AS.211.374 (02)Gendered VoicesTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMRefini, EugenioMaryland 202GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL
AS.211.374 (01)Gendered VoicesTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMRefini, EugenioMaryland 202GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL
AS.211.351 (01)Why Poetry Matters: Poets Between Lies and Truth in the English and Italian RenaissanceTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMBrenna, FrancescoBloomberg 172GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL