Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Survey of Greek Literature II: Hellenistic Period to Imperial Period
AS.040.418 (01)

We shall read, in the original Greek, major authors of Greek Literature from the Hellenistic period to the Imperial period.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate Latin
AS.040.208 (01)

Reading ability in Latin is developed through the study of various authors, primarily Cicero (fall) and Vergil (spring).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Ancient Greek
AS.040.306 (01)

Reading of prose or verse authors, depending on the needs of students. Co-listed with AS.040.702.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Island Archaeology: The Social Worlds of Crete, Cyprus and the Cyclades
AS.040.232 (01)

Islands present highly distinctive contexts for social life. We examine three island worlds of the third and second millennia BCE through their archaeological remains, each with its particularities. These are places where water had a unique and powerful meaning, where boat travel was part of daily life, where palaces flourished and where contact with other societies implied voyages of great distance across the sea. Class combines close study of material culture and consideration of island-specific interpretive paradigms; students work with artifacts in the JHU Archaeological Museum.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Elementary Ancient Greek
AS.040.106 (01)

Course provides comprehensive, intensive introduction to the study of ancient Greek. The first semester’s focus is morphology and vocabulary; the second semester’s emphasis is syntax and reading. Credit is given only upon completion of a year’s work. Course may not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elementary Latin
AS.040.108 (01)

Course provides comprehensive, intensive introduction to the study of Latin for new students as well as systematic review for students with background in Latin. The first semester's emphasis is on morphology and vocabulary; the second semester's focus is on syntax and reading. Credit is given only upon completion of a year's work. Course may not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.50
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate Ancient Greek
AS.040.206 (01)

Reading ability in classical Greek is developed through a study of various authors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Latin Poetry
AS.040.308 (01)

The aim of this course is to increase proficiency and improve comprehension of the Latin language. Intensive reading of Latin texts, with close attention to matters of grammar, idiom, and translation. Co-listed with AS.040.710.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Idea of Athens
AS.010.309 (01)

This course will explore the art, architecture, material culture, and textual evidence from the ancient city of Athens, the many cultures and social positions that made up the ancient city, and the idea of the city as something far beyond its reality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH

The Art and Archaeology of Early Greece
AS.040.102 (01)

This course explores the origins and rise of Greek civilization from the Early Bronze Age to the Persian Wars (ca. 3100-480 B.C.), focusing on major archaeological sites, sanctuaries, material culture, and artistic production.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/25
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Greek Philosophy: Plato and His Predecessors
AS.150.401 (01)

A study of pre-Socratic philosophers, especially those to whom Plato reacted; also an examination of major dialogues of Plato with emphasis upon his principal theses and characteristic methods.Cross-listed with Classics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): PHIL-ANCIEN

Classics Research Lab: The Symonds Project
AS.040.420 (01)

This course gives participants a unique opportunity to engage directly in empirical research and its interpretation and dissemination. Topics vary. This semester’s offering is organized around a project to reconstruct digitally the library of the nineteenth-century writer John Addington Symonds, author of one of the first studies of ancient sexuality. No prerequisites, but potential students should contact instructor for permission to enroll.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 2/12
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL

Why Poetry Matters: Poets Between Lies and Truth in the English and Italian Renaissance
AS.211.351 (01)

Does poetry participate in the quest for truth and knowledge? How does it compare to other such disciplines as history or philosophy? Are poets liars or do they have a deeper gaze on reality than anyone else? To answer these questions, this course studies poetry’s role within the different fields of human learning in the Renaissance. We will focus on the English and Italian tradition, reading texts by John Milton and Torquato Tasso, and explore the classical roots of the debate around poetry (Aristotle, Plato, Horace). We will then examine the relationship between science and literature through the work of Galileo Galilei. We will also study rare and ancient books in our library. The course is taught in English. All readings will be in English, but the original texts will also be available.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL

Poetry and Social Engagement
AS.220.454 (01)

In this Community-Based Learning course, students will explore poetry of social and political concern in partnership with high-school age writers from Baltimore public schools. Students will put learning into practice by engaging in community conversation and collaboration. Participation in some events outside of class time will be required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): WRIT-POET

Gendered Voices
AS.211.374 (02)

The course will explore the notion of ‘voice’ in order to show how poetry, literature, philosophy, and music have been dealing with it throughout the ages. In particular, by focusing on classical figures such as the Sirens, Circe and Echo, as well as by considering the seminal discussions of the 'voice' in Plato and Aristotle, the course will address the gendered nature of the voice as a tool to seduce and manipulate the human mind. More specifically, the course will discuss the ways in which male, female, queer, gendered and un-gendered voices embody different functions. Course materials include classical, medieval and early modern sources as well as later rewritings of myths concerned with the voice by authors such as Jules Verne, Karen Blixen, Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa, and Italo Calvino. A selection of theoretical works (e.g. Cavarero, Silverman, Dollar, Butler) will also be discussed. The course is taught in English and all materials will be available in English translation; Italian majors and minors should enroll in section 2.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/5
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL

Witchcraft and Demonology in Literature and the Arts
AS.211.477 (01)

Who were the witches? Why were they persecuted for hundreds of years? Why were women identified as the witches par excellence? How many witches were put to death between 1400 and 1800? What traits did European witch-mythologies share with other societies? After the witch-hunts ended, how did “The Witch” go from being “monstrous” to being “admirable” and even “sexy”? Answers are found in history and anthropology, but also in theology,literature, folklore, music, and the visual arts, including cinema.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/70
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL

Gendered Voices
AS.211.374 (01)

The course will explore the notion of ‘voice’ in order to show how poetry, literature, philosophy, and music have been dealing with it throughout the ages. In particular, by focusing on classical figures such as the Sirens, Circe and Echo, as well as by considering the seminal discussions of the 'voice' in Plato and Aristotle, the course will address the gendered nature of the voice as a tool to seduce and manipulate the human mind. More specifically, the course will discuss the ways in which male, female, queer, gendered and un-gendered voices embody different functions. Course materials include classical, medieval and early modern sources as well as later rewritings of myths concerned with the voice by authors such as Jules Verne, Karen Blixen, Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa, and Italo Calvino. A selection of theoretical works (e.g. Cavarero, Silverman, Dollar, Butler) will also be discussed. The course is taught in English and all materials will be available in English translation; Italian majors and minors should enroll in section 2.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/14
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.040.418 (01)Survey of Greek Literature II: Hellenistic Period to Imperial PeriodM 4:30PM - 7:00PMMontiglio, SilviaGilman 108
AS.040.208 (01)Intermediate LatinMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMToomey, Melissa EGilman 108
AS.040.306 (01)Advanced Ancient GreekTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMAsuni, MicheleGilman 108
AS.040.232 (01)Island Archaeology: The Social Worlds of Crete, Cyprus and the CycladesT 1:30PM - 4:00PMAnderson, Emily S.K.Gilman 130GARCH-ARCH
AS.040.106 (01)Elementary Ancient GreekMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, TTh 9:00AM - 9:50AMFranklin, RyanGilman 108
AS.040.108 (01)Elementary LatinMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMWarwick, RyanGilman 108
AS.040.206 (01)Intermediate Ancient GreekTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMAsuni, MicheleGilman 108
AS.040.308 (01)Advanced Latin PoetryMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMMontiglio, SilviaGilman 108
AS.010.309 (01)The Idea of AthensMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMStager, Jennifer M SGilman 177HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH
AS.040.102 (01)The Art and Archaeology of Early GreeceTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMAnderson, Emily S.K.Gilman 55ARCH-ARCH
AS.150.401 (01)Greek Philosophy: Plato and His PredecessorsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBett, RichardGilman 75PHIL-ANCIEN
AS.040.420 (01)Classics Research Lab: The Symonds ProjectTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMButler, Michael Shane, Dean, GabrielleGilman 108GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL
AS.211.351 (01)Why Poetry Matters: Poets Between Lies and Truth in the English and Italian RenaissanceTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMBrenna, FrancescoBloomberg 172GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL
AS.220.454 (01)Poetry and Social EngagementM 4:00PM - 6:20PMMalech, Dora RachelCroft Hall B32WRIT-POET
AS.211.374 (02)Gendered VoicesTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMRefini, EugenioMaryland 202GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL
AS.211.477 (01)Witchcraft and Demonology in Literature and the ArtsMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMStephens, Walter ELevering ArellanoGRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL
AS.211.374 (01)Gendered VoicesTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMRefini, EugenioMaryland 202GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL