Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Elementary Latin
AS.040.107 (01)

This course provides a comprehensive, intensive introduction to the study of Latin for new students, as well as a systematic review for those students with a background in Latin. Emphasis during the first semester will be on morphology and vocabulary. Credit is given only upon completion of a year’s work. Course may not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.50
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Buckley-Gorman, Richard Nicholas
  • Room: Gilman 108
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate Latin
AS.040.207 (01)

Although emphasis is still placed on development of rapid comprehension, readings and discussions introduce student to study of Latin literature, principally through texts of various authors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Dopico, Juan P
  • Room: Gilman 108
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate Ancient Greek
AS.040.205 (01)

Reading ability in classical Greek is developed through a study of various authors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Loi, Giacomo
  • Room: Gilman 108
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Representing Roman Power: Sculpture as Political Rhetoric from Republic to Empire
AS.010.222 (01)

Rome created one of the world’s most powerful empires that dominated the Mediterranean from the 3rd century BCE into the 4th century CE. As Rome expanded its borders, its cities saw a proliferation of sculptural monuments that produced a visual political rhetoric and expressed imperial ideologies. This class examines the close relationship between Roman sculpture and politics from the Republic through the Severan principate. Through close visual analysis of the ancient materials and critical readings of scholarship, this course will examine the role of sculpture in the formation, reproduction, and attenuation of imperial rule.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Miranda, Amy Christine
  • Room: Hodson 315
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/18
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC

Ancient Greek Civilization
AS.040.111 (01)

The course will introduce students to major aspects of the ancient Greek civilization, with special emphasis placed upon culture, society, archaeology, literature, and philosophy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Smith, Joshua M
  • Room: Gilman 108
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/12
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Elementary Ancient Greek
AS.040.105 (01)

This course provides a comprehensive, intensive introduction to the study of ancient Greek. During the first semester, the focus will be on morphology and vocabulary. Credit is given only upon completion of a year's work. Cannot be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MTWThF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Marzocchi, Ambra
  • Room: Gilman 108
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Art, Politics, and Propaganda in Ancient Rome
AS.040.147 (01)

We will examine visual expressions of propaganda in the city of Rome, considering how emperors used public art to promote their political agendas and their ideological vision of power."

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Tabeling, Adam
  • Room: Gilman 443
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Obsessed with the Past: the Art and Architecture of Medieval Rome
AS.010.431 (01)

In antiquity, Rome became the capital of an empire, its growing status reflected in its sophisticated urban planning, its architecture, and the arts. While an abundance of studies explores the revival of this glorious past in the Renaissance, this seminar discusses various ways of the reception of antiquity during the medieval period. We address the practice of using "spolia" in medieval architecture, the appropriation of ancient pagan buildings for the performance of Christian cult practices, the continuation of making (cult)images and their veneration, the meaning and specific visuality of Latin script (paleography and epigraphy) in later medieval art. We discuss the revival and systematic study of ancient knowledge (f. ex. medicine, astronomy, and the liberal arts), in complex allegorical murals. As we aim to reconstruct the art and architecture of medieval Rome, this course discusses ideas and concepts behind different forms of re-building and picturing the past, as they intersect with the self-referential character of a city that is obsessed with its own history.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Zchomelidse, Nino
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/8
  • PosTag(s): HART-MED

Heroes: The Ancient Greek Way
AS.040.245 (01)

Students will acquire more in-depth knowledge of Ancient Greek literature by reading and discussing its most important and famous texts, from the Iliad and the Odyssey to tragedy to philosophy. Knowledge of Greek is not required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Montiglio, Silvia
  • Room: Gilman 108
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Ancient Greek Civilization
AS.040.111 (02)

The course will introduce students to major aspects of the ancient Greek civilization, with special emphasis placed upon culture, society, archaeology, literature, and philosophy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Tabeling, Adam
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/12
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Advanced Ancient Greek
AS.040.305 (01)

Reading of prose or verse authors, depending on the needs of students. Co-listed with AS.040.705.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Smith, Joshua M
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Latin Prose
AS.040.307 (01)

This course aims to increase proficiency and improve comprehension of the Latin language. Intensive reading of Latin texts, with attention to grammar, idiom, translation, etc. Specific offerings vary. Co-listed with AS.040.707.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Warwick, Ryan
  • Room: Gilman 108
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Survey of Latin Literature I: Beginnings to the Augustan Age
AS.040.407 (01)

This intensive Latin survey is designed for very advanced undergraduate students--normally those who have completed two semesters of Advanced Latin (AS.040.307/308)--and PhD students preparing for their Latin translation exam. In this course, the first half of a year-long sequence, we will read substantial texts of major Republican and some Augustan authors. The weekly pace is designed to inculcate greater speed and accuracy in Latin reading, and provide significant coverage of various kinds of texts. Recommended background: AS.040.307-308 or equivalent

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Butler, Michael Shane
  • Room: Gilman 108
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.040.107 (01)Elementary LatinMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMBuckley-Gorman, Richard NicholasGilman 108
AS.040.207 (01)Intermediate LatinMWF 12:00PM - 12:50PMDopico, Juan PGilman 108
AS.040.205 (01)Intermediate Ancient GreekMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMLoi, GiacomoGilman 108
AS.010.222 (01)Freshman Seminar: Representing Roman Power: Sculpture as Political Rhetoric from Republic to EmpireMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMMiranda, Amy ChristineHodson 315HART-ANC
AS.040.111 (01)Ancient Greek CivilizationMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMSmith, Joshua MGilman 108ARCH-ARCH
AS.040.105 (01)Elementary Ancient GreekMTWThF 9:00AM - 9:50AMMarzocchi, AmbraGilman 108
AS.040.147 (01)Freshman Seminar: Art, Politics, and Propaganda in Ancient RomeTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMTabeling, AdamGilman 443
AS.010.431 (01)Obsessed with the Past: the Art and Architecture of Medieval RomeM 4:00PM - 6:30PMZchomelidse, NinoGilman 177HART-MED
AS.040.245 (01)Heroes: The Ancient Greek WayMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMMontiglio, SilviaGilman 108
AS.040.111 (02)Ancient Greek CivilizationTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMTabeling, AdamGilman 313ARCH-ARCH
AS.040.305 (01)Advanced Ancient GreekMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AMSmith, Joshua M 
AS.040.307 (01)Advanced Latin ProseTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMWarwick, RyanGilman 108
AS.040.407 (01)Survey of Latin Literature I: Beginnings to the Augustan AgeF 3:00PM - 5:30PMButler, Michael ShaneGilman 108

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Elementary Ancient Greek
AS.040.106 (01)

Course provides comprehensive, intensive introduction to the study of ancient Greek. The first semester’s focus is morphology and vocabulary; the second semester’s emphasis is syntax and reading. Credit is given only upon completion of a year’s work. Course may not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MTWThF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Gilman 108
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Elementary Latin
AS.040.108 (01)

Course provides comprehensive, intensive introduction to the study of Latin for new students as well as systematic review for students with background in Latin. The first semester's emphasis is on morphology and vocabulary; the second semester's focus is on syntax and reading. Credit is given only upon completion of a year's work. Course may not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

  • Credits: 3.50
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Gilman 108
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate Latin
AS.040.208 (01)

Reading ability in Latin is developed through the study of various authors, primarily Cicero (fall) and Vergil (spring).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Gilman 108
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Ancient Novel
AS.040.300 (01)

In this course we will follow the fortunes of the ancient Greek and Roman novels.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:45PM - 7:15PM
  • Instructor: Montiglio, Silvia
  • Room: Gilman 108
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Other Life of the Doctor: Fiction, Identity, and the Intellectual in the Roman Empire
AS.040.377 (01)

This course explores the role of fiction in the presentation of personal identity among the intellectual elite of the Roman Empire. Intellectuals in the so-called ‘Second Sophistic’ told stories which are ridiculous, bizarre, and clearly fictional. Some pretend to have visited utopias in the wilderness, of having seen scientific and medical marvels, and of communing with other dead intellectuals. This class focuses on stories of the unbelievable, paradoxical, and fake but which are written as first hand accounts by real historical intellectuals of the Roman Empire. The class will be broken down into providing background as to what a Greek intellectual or ‘sophist’ was exactly, what demands were placed on intellectuals to make up stories, such as in the performance of declamation, and how even from the early days of Greek history the boundaries between truth and fiction were at issue. After providing context to characters and settings of the Roman Empire’s intellectual culture, we examine the voices of people, including physicians like Galen, who used the fictional motifs of utopias, adventures, romance, ghosts stories among others to construct their identities. These fictional elements often were the means by which issues of ethnicity, power, gender, and tradition were hashed out. All sources are provided in English and no experience or background in Classics is required to participate in the course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Franklin, Ryan
  • Room: Gilman 75
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Ancient Greek Mythology: Art, Narratives, and Modern Mythmaking
AS.040.121 (01)

This course focuses on major and often intricate myths and mythical patterns of thought as they are reflected in compelling ancient visual and textual narratives. Being one of the greatest treasure troves of the ancient world, these myths will further be considered in light of their rich reception in the medieval and modern world (including their reception in the modern fields of anthropology and philosophy).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Yatromanolakis, Dimitrios
  • Room: Gilman 75
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Ancient Greek
AS.040.306 (01)

Reading of prose or verse authors, depending on the needs of students. Co-listed with AS.040.702.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Montiglio, Silvia
  • Room: Gilman 108
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Classics Research Lab: Antioch Recovery Project (ARP)
AS.010.444 (01)

Antioch Recovery Project investigates mosaics from the ancient city of Antioch (modern Antakya, Turkey, near the border with Syria) now in the collection of the Baltimore Museum of Art. Excavated by an international team of archaeologists in the 1930s, hundreds of ancient mosaics from the cosmopolitan city were subsequently dispersed to museums across the globe, with twenty-four mosaics entering the collection of the BMA. Phase I will focus on the digital documentation and analysis of the mosaic of Narcissus as a prototype for ongoing research bringing together the fragments of ancient Antioch for contemporary beholders. The Greek myth of Narcissus tells the story of a beautiful Theban hunter doomed to love his own reflection and is the origin of the modern psychiatric term “narcissism”. Researching the mythology, materials, conservation history, archival material, historiography, and contemporary reception of the Narcissus mosaic and myth offers extensive opportunities to collaborate with scholars across a range of disciplines at JHU, in the Baltimore museum community, and beyond. Investigators will move between the Baltimore Museum of Art, the CRL processing lab in Gilman Hall, and Special Collections. The course will involve some travel to visit other mosaics from Antioch now in collections at Harvard’s Dumbarton Oaks in Washington D.C., and the Princeton Art Museum in Princeton, New Jersey.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Stager, Jennifer M S
  • Room: Gilman 261
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH

Advanced Latin Poetry
AS.040.308 (01)

The aim of this course is to increase proficiency and improve comprehension of the Latin language. Intensive reading of Latin texts, with close attention to matters of grammar, idiom, and translation. Co-listed with AS.040.710.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30PM - 11:45PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Gilman 108
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intermediate Ancient Greek
AS.040.206 (01)

Reading ability in classical Greek is developed through a study of various authors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Gilman 108
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Survey of Latin Literature II: Early Empire to the Post-Classical Period
AS.040.408 (01)

This intensive Latin survey is designed for very advanced undergraduate students (normally those who have completed the regular undergraduate sequence through the advanced level) and PhD students preparing for their Latin translation exam. In this course, the second half of a year-long sequence, we will read substantial texts of major Imperial authors, as well as a selection of works from Late Antiquity and the Post-Classical period. The weekly pace is designed to inculcate greater speed and accuracy in Latin reading and to provide significant coverages of various kinds of texts. Prior completion of AS.040.407 preferred but not required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Roller, Matthew
  • Room: Gilman 108
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Archaeology of Cyprus: Investigating a Mediterranean Island World in the JHU Museum
AS.040.400 (01)

This course explores the visual and material worlds of ancient Cyprus from the earliest human evidence through the Iron Age. Class involves regular analysis of artifacts based in the Archaeological Museum.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Anderson, Emily S.K.
  • Room: Gilman 150A
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/12
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Witchcraft and Demonology in Literature and the Arts
AS.211.477 (01)

Who were the witches? Why were they persecuted for hundreds of years? Why were women identified as the witches par excellence? How many witches were put to death between 1400 and 1800? What traits did European witch-mythologies share with other societies? After the witch-hunts ended, how did “The Witch” go from being “monstrous” to being “admirable” and even “sexy”? Answers are found in history and anthropology, but also in theology,literature, folklore, music, and the visual arts, including cinema.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL

Introduction To Archaeology
AS.136.101 (01)

An introduction to archaeology and to archaeological method and theory, exploring how archaeologists excavate, analyze, and interpret ancient remains in order to reconstruct how ancient societies functioned. Specific examples from a variety of archaeological projects in different parts of the world will be used to illustrate techniques and principles discussed.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Anderson, Emily S.K.
  • Room: Shaffer 100
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/50
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.040.106 (01)Elementary Ancient GreekMTWThF 9:00AM - 9:50AMStaffGilman 108
AS.040.108 (01)Elementary LatinMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMStaffGilman 108
AS.040.208 (01)Intermediate LatinMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMStaffGilman 108
AS.040.300 (01)The Ancient NovelM 4:45PM - 7:15PMMontiglio, SilviaGilman 108
AS.040.377 (01)The Other Life of the Doctor: Fiction, Identity, and the Intellectual in the Roman EmpireTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMFranklin, RyanGilman 75
AS.040.121 (01)Ancient Greek Mythology: Art, Narratives, and Modern MythmakingMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMYatromanolakis, DimitriosGilman 75
AS.040.306 (01)Advanced Ancient GreekMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMMontiglio, SilviaGilman 108
AS.010.444 (01)Classics Research Lab: Antioch Recovery Project (ARP)Th 3:00PM - 5:30PMStager, Jennifer M SGilman 261HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH
AS.040.308 (01)Advanced Latin PoetryTTh 10:30PM - 11:45PMStaffGilman 108
AS.040.206 (01)Intermediate Ancient GreekTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMStaffGilman 108
AS.040.408 (01)Survey of Latin Literature II: Early Empire to the Post-Classical PeriodTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMRoller, MatthewGilman 108
AS.040.400 (01)The Archaeology of Cyprus: Investigating a Mediterranean Island World in the JHU MuseumT 1:30PM - 4:00PMAnderson, Emily S.K.Gilman 150AARCH-ARCH
AS.211.477 (01)Witchcraft and Demonology in Literature and the ArtsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStephens, Walter EGilman 132GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL
AS.136.101 (01)Introduction To ArchaeologyMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMAnderson, Emily S.K.Shaffer 100ARCH-ARCH